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Be not judges of your own condition, but let Christ judge

Be not judges of your own condition, but let Christ judge

Be not judges of your own condition, but let Christ judge. You are invited to take the comfort of this gospel truth, that “there is forgiveness with God.” You say, not for you. So said Jacob, “My way is hid from the LORD,” Isaiah 40:27; and Zion said so too, Isaiah 44:14, “The LORD hath forsaken me, and my Lord hath forgotten me.” But did they make a right judgment of themselves? We find in those places God was otherwise minded. This false judgment, made by souls in their entanglements, of their own condition, is oft times a most unconquerable hindrance unto the bettering of it. They fill themselves with thoughts of their own about it, and on them they dwell, instead of looking out for a remedy. Misgiving thoughts of their distempers are commonly a great part of some men’s sickness. Many diseases are apt to cloud the thoughts, and to cause misapprehensions concerning their own nature and danger. And these delusions are a real part of the person’s sickness. Nature is no less impaired and weakened by them, the efficacy of remedies no less obstructed, than by any other real distemper. In such cases we persuade men to acquiesce in the judgment of their skillful physician; not always to be wasting themselves in and by their own tainted imaginations, and so despond upon their own mistakes, but to rest in what is informed them by him who is acquainted with the causes and tendency of their indisposition better than themselves. It is ofttimes one part of the soul’s depths to have false apprehensions of its condition. Sin is a madness (Ecclesiastes 9:3); so far as anyone is under the power of it, he is under the power of madness. Madness doth not sooner nor more effectually discover itself in any way or any thing than in possessing them in whom it is with strange conceits and apprehensions of themselves. So doth this madness of sin, according to its degrees and prevalency. Hence some cry, “Peace, peace,” when “sudden destruction is at hand” (1 Thessalonians 5:3). It is that madness, under whose power they are, which gives them such groundless imaginations of themselves and their own condition. And some say they are lost forever, when God is with them.

Do you, then, your duty and let Christ judge of your state. Your concernment is too great to make a reasonable demand to commit the judgment of your condition to any other. When eternal welfare or woe are at the stake, for a man to renounce his own thoughts, to give up himself implicitly to the judgment of men and liars like himself, is stupidity. But there is no danger of being deceived by the sentence of Christ. The truth is, whether we will or no, he will judge; and according as he determines, so shall things be found at the last day, (John 5:22) “The Father judgeth no man” (that is,immediately and in his own person), “but hath committed all judgment unto the Son.” All judgment that respects eternity, whether it be to be passed in this world or in that to come, is committed unto him. Accordingly in that place he judgeth both of things and persons. Things he determines upon, verse 24, “He that heareth my word, and believeth on him that sent me, hath everlasting life, and shall not come into condemnation; but is passed from death unto life.” Let me say what they please, this sentence shall stand; faith and eternal life are inseparably conjoined. And so of persons, verse 38, “Ye have not” (saith he to the Pharisees, who were much otherwise minded) “the word of God abiding in you.”

Take not, then, the office and prerogative of Christ out of his hand, by making a judgment, upon your own reasonings and conclusions and deductions, of your estate and condition.

– John Owen, Works, Volume 6, pages 542-542.

The Sinner’s Encouragement

The Sinner’s Encouragement

Come as a sinner and you will find all in your favor – all, the door open and every face smiling upon you. But if you attempt to come as a saint, and you are dubious whether you are so or not, you will come as an impostor and a hypocrite; and you will be detested – there can be no doubt that you are a sinner. Well, then, come in your real character and you will be welcome. Every thing in the councils of heaven favors a returning sinner – election, particular redemption, vocation, justification, etc. – all, all are in his favor and give him every encouragement he can want and God can give. But impostors are abhorred. And such is everyone who assumes a character which he is not sure belongs to him.

– Thomas Charles, Spiritual Counsels, pgs 387,388.

John Owen on mortification of sin

John Owen on mortification of sin

The choicest believers, who are assuredly freed from the condemning power of sin, ought yet to make it their business all their days to mortify the indwelling power of sin.

Mortification from a self-strength, carried on by ways of self-invention, unto the end of a self-righteousness, is the soul and substance of all false religion in the world.

The vigour, and power, and comfort of our spiritual life depends on the mortification of the deeds of the flesh.

Do you mortify; do you make it your daily work; be always at it whilst you live; cease not a day from this work; be killing sin or it will be killing you. Your being dead with Christ virtually, your being quickened with him, will not excuse you from this work.

Who can say that he had ever any thing to do with God or for God, that indwelling sin had not a hand in the corrupting of what he did? And this trade will it drive more or less all our days. If, then, sin will be always acting, if we be not always mortifying, we are lost creatures. He that stands still and suffers his enemies to double blows upon him without resistance, will undoubtedly be conquered in the issue. If sin be subtle, watchful, strong, and always at work in the business of killing our souls, and we be slothful, negligent, foolish, in proceeding to the ruin thereof, can we expect a comfortable event? There is not a day but sin foils or is foiled, prevails or is prevailed on; and it will be so whilst we live in this world.

There is not the best saint in the world but, if he should give over this duty, would fall into as many cursed sins as ever any did of his kind.

The contest is for our lives and souls. Not to be daily employing the Spirit and new nature for the mortifying of sin, is to neglect that excellent succour which God hath given us against our greatest enemy. If we neglect to make use of what we have received, God may justly hold his hand from giving us more. His graces, as well as his gifts, are bestowed on us to use, exercise, and trade with. Not to be daily mortifying sin, is to sin against the goodness, kindness, wisdom, grace, and love of God, who hath furnished us with a principle of doing it.

Where sin, through the neglect of mortification, gets a considerable victory, it breaks the bones of the soul, Ps. xxxi. 10, li. 8, and makes a man weak, sick, and ready to die, Ps. xxxviii. 3-5, so that he cannot look up, Ps. xl. 12, Isa. xxxiii. 24; and when poor creatures will take blow after blow, wound after wound, foil after foil, and never rouse up themselves to a vigorous opposition, can they expect any thing but to be hardened through the deceitfulness of sin, and that their souls should bleed to death? 2 John 8. Indeed, it is a sad thing to consider the fearful issues of this neglect, which lie under our eyes every day.

Let not that man think he makes any progress in holiness who walks not over the bellies of his lusts. He who doth not kill sin in this way takes no steps towards his journey’s end.

The root of an unmortified course is the digestion of sin without bitterness in the heart. When a man hath confirmed his imagination to such an apprehension of grace and mercy as to be able, without bitterness, to swallow and digest daily sins, that man is at the very brink of turning the grace of God into lasciviousness, and being hardened by the deceitfulness of sin. Neither is there a greater evidence of a false and rotten heart in the world than to drive such a trade.

– From Volume 6 of Owen’s Works

The primary purpose of the Church

The primary purpose of the Church

I would lay it down as a basic proposition that the primary task of the Church is not to educate man, is not to heal him physically or psychologically, it is not to make him happy. I will go further; it is not even to make him good. These are things that accompany salvation; and when the Church performs her true task she does incidentally educate men and give them knowledge and information, she does bring them happiness, she does make them good and better than they were. But my point is that those are not her primary objectives. Her primary purpose is not any of these; it is rather to put man into the right relationship with God, to reconcile man to God. This really does need to be emphasised at the present time, because this, it seems to me, is the essence of the modern fallacy. It has come into the Church and it is influencing the thinking of many in the Church—this notion that the business of the Church is to make people happy, or to integrate their lives, or to relieve their circumstances and improve their conditions.

 

– Martyn Lloyd-Jones, Preaching and Preachers

John Newton on Matthew 11:25

John Newton on Matthew 11:25

Though the things of nearest consequence to you are in the Bible, and you should read it over and over till you commit the whole book to your memory; yet you will not understand, or discern the truth as it is in Jesus, unless the Lord the Spirit shows it to you. The dispensation of truth is in his hand; and without him all the fancied advantages of superior capacity, learning, criticism, and books will prove as useless as spectacles to the blind. The great encouragement is, that this infallible Spirit, so necessary to guide us in the way of peace, is promised to all who sincerely ask it.